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Category: Non-Fiction/Reference

Non-Fiction/Reference

Showing 501–520 of 528 results

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    Venkat Iyer was living a fast-paced life in the IT world in Mumbai when he decided to stop and take a long, hard look at where he was headed. Disheartened by his stressful existence in the city, he decided to give it all up and take up organic farming in a small village near Mumbai. But it wasn’t easy. With no experience in agriculture, his journey was fraught with uncertainty. He soon went from negotiating tough clients, strict deadlines and traffic to looking forward to his first bumper crop of moong. As he battled erratic weather conditions and stubborn farm animals, he discovered a world with fresh air and organic food, one where he could lead a more wholesome existence. At times hilarious, and other times profound, this book follows his extraordinary story.

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    Manjeet Hirani was adamant that a dog would never enter her house, but that was before little Buddy arrived at her doorstep.

    One day, the doorbell rang. Her husband, Rajkumar Hirani, who had just finished shooting for the film PK, had sent a parcel for their son. It was an adorable puppy, one that had played the role of a depressed dog in the movie. It wasn’t long before Manjeet grew to love Buddy.

    In this book, she writes about attachment, parenting, and karma, among other things. She shows how having a dog in the house can alter your perspective and change the way you experience life.

    How to Be Human is a charming and heart-warming book that, with its light touch, will make you look at life from a less cynical standpoint.

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  • Delhi: Phoenix City

    One of the biggest challenges facing India today is the question of reservation for the nation’s minority communities. Although the Constitution of India affirms equal justice for all, the manner in which legislatures and courts operate often compromises justice in the name of political pragmatism. As a result, the voiceless and vulnerable members of society—Dalits, tribals, women and religious minorities—continue to be excluded and marginalized.
    Taking Sides outlines a credible roadmap to aid the quest for an inclusive and just society. Examining this churning debate from several points of view, Rudolf Heredia makes a persuasive argument for a justice premised on liberty, tempered by equality and moderated by fraternity—a justice beyond politics.

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  • Banaras: City of Light

    Decades of State and non-State violence in PBI – India’s landlocked North-east have taken a heavy toll on livelihoods, incomes, governance, growth and image, besides lives. Despite vast amounts of money being pumped into the region, basic needs and minimum services are yet to be met in terms of connectivity, health, education and power. What are the possible ways forward as the region stands at a crossroads? These fifteen personal essays provide an insider’s take on wide-ranging issues: from the Brahmaputra and the use of natural resources to peace talks in Nagaland; from the Centre’s failure to repeal the hated Armed Forces Special Powers Act, threats to the environment, corruption in government and extortion by armed groups to New Delhi’s Look East Policy and much more. Yet, as these essays make clear, hope, though distant, is not absent or lost. Restoring governance through people-driven development programmes, peace building through civil society initiatives, assuring the pre-eminence of local communities as evident in Hazarika’s conversations with the legendary Naga leader, Th. Muivah, and simple economic interventions through appropriate technologies — boats and health care, community mobilization and micro-credit — hold promise for solutions to the web of violence, poverty and marginalization. Writing on the Wall is a passionate call to all stakeholders in the North-east to embrace dialogue and use given platforms for peace, to go beyond the politics of tolerance to that of mutual respect. Only such multi-disciplinary, innovative approaches, rooted in realism, can bring stability and sustainable change to the region.

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  • Celebrating Delhi

    This book is a serious study of the situation in the Northeast- and that includes Bangladesh. And no better man could have been found to write about the area and its people than Sanjoy Hazarika. What sets the book apart is its focus on migrants not as just numbers but people for whom border crossing is an inevitable necessity.

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  • Memory's Gold: Writings on Calcutta

    “Millions of people are displaced every year by development schemes such as the construction of dams, national parks, factories, SEZs, mines and thermal power plants. The conflict between those who are forced to part with their land and those who reap benefits from the projects is getting fiercer.
    In A Village Awaits Doomsday, Jaideep Hardikar brings us the personal stories of ordinary people from across the country displaced and made destitute by innumerable government and private initiatives. Apart from providing vivid accounts of individual experiences, he analyses the reasons why people protest, the laws that governments use to displace them, the existing rehabilitation and resettlement policies, and the latest debates over the land acquisition process.
    Hardikar’s writing is evocative, the stories haunting and his book timely and important.”

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  • Calcutta: Two Years in the City

    Alongside his highly acclaimed novels, Mohsin Hamid has over the years written superb pieces about politics, literature and his own life. Collected together for the first time, they show that Hamid is not just a great novelist but ‘a master critic of the modern global condition’. Provocative, dexterous and full of ideas—this is a sparkling collection.

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  • Rajasthan: An Oral History

    From nuclear proliferation to Jihadi terrorism, the partition of India continues to cast a long shadow even today. Nobody expected the liberation of India and the birth of Pakistan to be so bloody. But in 1946, a full year before Independence, a terrible cycle of riots began, starting with Calcutta and going on to engulf many parts of the country. As the British rushed to leave, thousands of Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs were brutally killed in communal violence. Midnight’s Furies vividly recreates that tragic period through personal stories and eyewitness accounts, and recounts the complex relationships between Nehru, Patel, Jinnah and Mountbatten. It shows how Partition, which has created such a wide gulf between two countries whose people have so much in common, has given birth to global terrorism and dangerous nuclear proliferation today.

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    The poems of Rabindranath Tagore are among the most haunting and tender in Indian and world literature, expressing a profound and passionate human yearning. His ceaselessly inventive works deal with such subjects as the interplay between God and mortals, the eternal and the transient, and the paradox of an endlessly changing universe that is in tune with unchanging harmonies. Poems such as “Earth” and “In the Eyes of a Peacock” present a picture of natural processes unaffected by human concerns, while others, as in “Recovery14,” convey the poet’s bewilderment about his place in the world. And exuberant works such as “New Rain” and “Grandfather’s Holiday” describe Tagore’s sheer joy at the glories of nature or simply in watching a grandchild play.

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  • Jungle Trees of Central India

    “In this stunning collection of poems by Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore, acclaimed translator Ketaki Kushari Dyson brilliantly captures the energy and lyricism of the legendary poet’s verses.

    The title poem evokes the inner turmoil of a man who must return to the drudgery of work after visiting his home for the Durga Puja vacation. Haunted by his four-year-old daughter’s parting words, ‘I won’t let you go!’ he finds his anguish reflected in the vagaries of nature, with the earth echoing his pain.

    The other poems in this collection brim with Tagore’s compassionate humanity and delicate sensuousness. From detailing the nuances of intimate relationships to ruminating on the vast cosmos, these poems glow with a burning awareness of man’s place in the universe, reaffirming Tagore’s reputation as one of India’s greatest modern poets.”

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    “Gathering the work of a lifetime, spanning four books of poetry, and including thirty-four new poems, Collected Poems is the first comprehensive collection of the work of one of India’s most influential English language poets. Arvind Krishna Mehrotra’s poetry has long been known for its mixing of the commonplace and the strange, the autobiographical and the fabulous, in which the insignificant details of everyday life-whether contemporary or historical-bring larger patterns into focus.

    Mehrotra’s celebrated translations from Indian languages (Prakrit, Hindi, Gujarati, Bengali) take up a third of Collected Poems. Selections from The Absent Traveller and Songs of Kabir are followed by those of Nirala, Vinod Kumar Shukla, Mangalesh Dabral, Pavankumar Jain and Shakti Chattopadhyay. Together they tell the story of Indian poetry over two millennia.”

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    Based on a meticulous exploration of the primary sources and oral testimonies of the survivors and victims of 1919, V.N. Datta crafts a unique and first-hand narrative of the most violent event and its legacy in the history of modern India and provides a complex picture of the city of Amritsar, where he grew up. Jallianwala Bagh is a rigorous account of the causes, nature and impact of the carnage that shook the nation and irreparably wounded its collective consciousness. A pathbreaking study that moves the focus away from the frames of imperialism and nationalism, Datta brings a local and an altogether different scholarly perspective on imperial racial and military violence in the twentieth century. This highly readable work in its revised edition is of tremendous historical and contemporary value.

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  • 108 Upanishads, The : An Introduction

    The voices who could tell the Indian story of the First World War have long been silenced, but at last India is getting the chance to hear its own soldiers speaking in this collection of letters sent by them while they served in France. Fighting alongside soldiers whose language, customs and indeed colour were strange to them, these letters bear eloquent witness to the sepoys’ often unsettling encounters with Europe and European culture. By turns poignant, funny and moving, they provide an intimate picture of the world of the Western Front.

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  • The Partition of India in 1947 was one of the most horrific events of decolonization in the twentieth century. The geographical divide brought displacement and death, rape and plunder, benefiting the few at the expense of the very many.

    In The Great Partition, Yasmin Khan exposes the widespread obliviousness to what Partition would entail in practice as well as the haste and recklessness with which it was completed. Moreover, she powerfully underscores the catastrophic human cost and shows why the repercussions of Partition resound even now, some sixty years later. Drawing on fresh information from an array of sources, Khan provides an authoritative and accessible analysis of Partition, and the damaging legacy left in its wake.

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  • The twenty-first century woman juggles home, work, friends—all in a day’s work. And this demanding lifestyle is taking its deadly toll on her. With women’s health issues suddenly on the rise, Dr Mathai’s Holistic Health Guide for Women is what every woman must have. It contains causes, solutions, and treatments for cancer, PCOS, arthritis, etc., based on ayurveda, homeopathy, and naturopathy as well as complementary therapies such as yoga, acupuncture, reflexology, and acupressure. With simple DIYs and home remedies, this book is the ultimate guide to a healthy life.

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