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Category: MATHEMATICS

MATHEMATICS

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  • When two English brothers take the helm of a Barbados sugar plantation, Washington Black – an eleven year-old field slave – finds himself selected as personal servant to one of these men. The eccentric Christopher ‘Titch’ Wilde is a naturalist, explorer, scientist, inventor and abolitionist, whose single-minded pursuit of the perfect aerial machine mystifies all around him. From the blistering cane fields of Barbados to the icy wastes of the Canadian Arctic, from the mud-drowned streets of London to the eerie deserts of Morocco, Washington Black teems with all the strangeness and mystery of life. Inspired by a true story, Washington Black is the extraordinary tale of a world destroyed and made whole again.

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  • The Book of Numbers has been translated into 15 languages.

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  • With outsize supplies of cash, talent, and ambition, a small group of corporations including Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google have been gradually seizing leadership – and consumer confidence – around the world. In Silicon States, renowned futurist Lucie Greene offers an unparalleled look at the players, promises, and potential problems of Big Tech. Through interviews with corporate leaders, influential venture capitalists, scholars, journalists, activists, and more, Greene explores the tension inherent in Silicon Valley’s global influence. If these companies can invent a social network, how might they soon transform our political and health-care systems? If they can revolutionize the cell phone, what might they do for space travel, education, or the housing market? As Silicon Valley faces increased scrutiny over its mistreatment of women, cultural shortcomings, and its role in widespread Russian election interference, we are learning where its interests truly lie, and about the great power these companies wield over an unsuspecting citizenry.

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  • Weird Maths is a lively, accessible, fun book about mathematics, the maths that is all around us, that defines us, our intelligence, our curiosity. In this delightful journey of discovery, David Darling and Agnijo Banerjee explore the cutting edge of modern maths and delve into some fascinating questions: Is anything truly random? Does infinity actually exist? Can maths help us understand chaos? Can chess be solved with maths? If there are aliens and if they play music, would we like it? Packed with puzzles and paradoxes, mind-bending concepts and surprising solutions, Weird Maths is a book for anyone who is interested in maths or in popular science.

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  • So how come we’re not dead yet? In this lively and accessible book, Idan Ben-Barak tells us why. He explores the immune system and what keeps it running, how germs are destroyed, and why we develop immunities to certain disease-causing agents. He also examines the role of antibiotics and vaccines, and looks at what the future holds for our collective chances of not being dead. This is entertaining and thoughtful science writing to inspire the student interested in a career in medicine or immunology, or to inform the reader who just wants to understand more about their body while having a laugh along the way.

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  • It was while growing up as a child in India that astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan felt the need to locate herself in the world. Her love affair with scientific discovery and exploration started when she wrote the code to generate the monthly sky map over Delhi for a national newspaper. Mapping the Heavens provides a tour of the greatest hits of cosmological discovery. The cosmos, once understood to be alone and small, filled with the ordinary, is now a universe that is expanding at an accelerating pace, structured by dark matter and propelled by dark energy. Natarajan is currently involved in one of the largest and most innovative mapping exercises of the universe ever undertaken-the Hubble Fields Initiative.

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  • Emotions are powerful. In newspaper headlines and on social media, they have become the primary way of understanding the world. But strong feelings make it more difficult to see the reality behind the rhetoric. In the Art of Logic, Eugenia Cheng shows how mathematical logic can help us see things more clearly – and know when politicians and companies are trying to mislead us. Clear-sighted, revelatory and filled with useful real-life examples of logic and illogic at work, the Art of Logic is an essential guide to decoding modern life.

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  • <p>Uncertainty is everywhere. It lurks in every consideration of the future – the weather the economy the sex of an unborn child – even quantities we think that we know such as populations or the transit of the planets contain the possibility of error. It's no wonder that throughout that history we have attempted to produce rigidly defined areas of uncertainty – we prefer the surprise party to the surprise asteroid. </p><p>We began our quest to make certain an uncertain world by reading omens in livers tea leaves and the stars. However over the centuries driven by curiosity competition and a desire be better gamblers pioneering mathematicians and scientists began to reduce wild uncertainties to tame distributions of probability and statistical inferences. But even as unknown unknowns became known unknowns our pessimism made us believe that some problems were unsolvable and our intuition misled us. Worse as we realized how omnipresent and varied uncertainty is we encountered chaos quantum mechanics and the limitations of our predictive power. </p><p>Bestselling author Professor Ian Stewart explores the history and mathematics of uncertainty. Touching on gambling probability statistics financial and weather forecasts censuses medical studies chaos quantum physics and climate he makes one thing clear: a reasonable probability is the only certainty.</p>>

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  • <p><b>SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2017 ROYAL SOCIETY SCIENCE BOOK PRIZE </b></p><p>Even small children know there are infinitely many whole numbers – start counting and you'll never reach the end. But there are also infinitely many decimal numbers between zero and one. Are these two types of infinity the same? Are they larger or smaller than each other? Can we even talk about 'larger' and 'smaller' when we talk about infinity? In <i>Beyond Infinity</i> international maths sensation Eugenia Cheng reveals the inner workings of infinity.</p><p>What happens when a new guest arrives at your infinite hotel – but you already have an infinite number of guests? How does infinity give Zeno's tortoise the edge in a paradoxical foot-race with Achilles? And can we really make an infinite number of cookies from a finite amount of cookie dough?</p><p>Wielding an armoury of inventive intuitive metaphor Cheng draws beginners and enthusiasts alike into the heart of this mysterious powerful concept to reveal fundamental truths about mathematics all the way from the infinitely large down to the infinitely small.</p>>

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  • Gamblers have been trying to figure out how to game the system since our ancestors first made wagers over dice fashioned from knucklebones: in revolutionary Paris, the ‘martingale’ strategy was rumoured to lead to foolproof success at the roulette table; now, in the 21st century, professional gamblers are using cutting-edge techniques to tilt the odds further in their favour. At the roulette wheel, card table or racecourse, science is giving us the competitive edge over opponents, casinos and bookmakers. But is there such a thing as a perfect bet? The Perfect Bet looks beyond probability and statistics to examine how wagers have inspired a plethora of new disciplines – spanning chaos theory, behavioural psychology, machine learning and game theory – which are not just revolutionising gambling, but changing our fundamental notions about chance, randomness and luck.

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  • Most people imagine maths is something like a slow cooker: very useful, but pretty limited in what it can do. Maths, though, isn't just a tool for solving a specific problem – and it's definitely not something to be afraid of. Whether you're a maths glutton or have forgotten how long division works (or never really knew in the first place), the chances are you've missed what really makes maths exciting. Calling on a baker's dozen of entertaining, puzzling examples and mathematically illuminating culinary analogies – including chocolate brownies, iterated Battenberg cakes, sandwich sandwiches, Yorkshire puddings and Möbius bagels – brilliant young academic and mathematical crusader Eugenia Cheng is here to tell us why we should all love maths.

    From simple numeracy to category theory ('the mathematics of mathematics'), Cheng takes us through the joys of the mathematical world. Packed with recipes, puzzles to surprise and delight even the innumerate, Cake, Custard and Category Theory will whet the appetite of maths whizzes and arithmophobes alike. (Not to mention aspiring cooks: did you know you can use that slow cooker to make clotted cream?) This is maths at its absolute tastiest.>

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  • Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of – real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative – along with several you might have thought you couldn’t think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart’s guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes, sudoko, Rubik’s cube, music, primes and pi. You may be surprised to find you live in eleven-dimensional space, that of the twenty-three people on a football pitch two are more likely than not to share the same birthday, and that forty-two is a very interesting number. Professor Stewart’s Incredible Numbers will delight everyone who loves numbers – including those who currently think they don’t.

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  • Maths is the story of the world around us, and the wisdom it gives us can be the difference between success and disaster.

    We are all doing maths all the time, from the way we communicate with each other to the way we travel, from how we work to how we relax. Many of us are aware of this. But few of us really appreciate the full power of maths – the extent to which its influence is not only in every office and every home, but also in every courtroom and hospital ward.

    In this eye-opening and extraordinary book, Yates explores the true stories of life-changing events in which the application – or misapplication – of mathematics has played a critical role: patients crippled by faulty genes and entrepreneurs bankrupted by faulty algorithms; innocent victims of miscarriages of justice and the unwitting victims of software glitches. We follow stories of investors who have lost fortunes and parents who have lost children, all because of mathematical misunderstandings.

    Along the way, Yates arms us with simple mathematical rules and tools that can help us make better decisions in our increasingly quantitative society. You will discover why it’s always sensible to question a statistic, often vital to ask for a second opinion and sometimes surprisingly handy to stick to the 37% rule…

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  • Why do so many of us struggle to remember the maths we were taught at school? The answer is that we can successfully memorise things for a short period but we only retain those memories long term if we understand them. Mattias Ribbing is a Grand Master of Memory who will show you how to remember maths through truly understanding it. His methods are simple but will last for life, and unwrap the puzzle of maths forever.

    The key to confidence with numbers is not remembering complex rules surrounding long division or algebra; it’s understanding the critical components of maths and being able to clearly visualise problems and solutions. This illuminating guide to improving your maths provides logical, long-term strategies that will enable you to finally get maths and hold on to that level of confidence thereafter.

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  • The world’s greatest mental mathematical magician takes us on a spellbinding journey through the wonders of numbers (and more)

    “Arthur Benjamin … joyfully shows you how to make nature’s numbers dance.”–Bill Nye (the science guy)

    The Magic of Math is the math book you wish you had in school. Using a delightful assortment of examples-from ice-cream scoops and poker hands to measuring mountains and making magic squares-this book revels in key mathematical fields including arithmetic algebra geometry and calculus plus Fibonacci numbers infinity and of course mathematical magic tricks. Known throughout the world as the “mathemagician” Arthur Benjamin mixes mathematics and magic to make the subject fun attractive and easy to understand for math fan and math-phobic alike.

    “A positively joyful exploration of mathematics.”
    Publishers Weekly starred review

    “Each [trick] is more dazzling than the last.”
    Physics World

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  • The world’s greatest mental mathematical magician takes us on a spellbinding journey through the wonders of numbers (and more)

    “Arthur Benjamin … joyfully shows you how to make nature’s numbers dance.”–Bill Nye (the science guy)

    The Magic of Math is the math book you wish you had in school. Using a delightful assortment of examples-from ice-cream scoops and poker hands to measuring mountains and making magic squares-this book revels in key mathematical fields including arithmetic algebra geometry and calculus plus Fibonacci numbers infinity and of course mathematical magic tricks. Known throughout the world as the “mathemagician” Arthur Benjamin mixes mathematics and magic to make the subject fun attractive and easy to understand for math fan and math-phobic alike.

    “A positively joyful exploration of mathematics.”
    Publishers Weekly starred review

    “Each [trick] is more dazzling than the last.”
    Physics World

    >

    Read More
  • Mathematician Ian Stewart tells readers what he wishes he had known when he was a student. He takes up subjects ranging from the philosophical to the practical-what mathematics is and why it's worth doing the relationship between logic and proof the role of beauty in mathematical thinking the future of mathematics how to deal with the peculiarities of the mathematical community and many others.

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  • From Newton’s Law of Gravity to the Black-Scholes model used by bankers to predict the markets, equations, are everywhere – and they are fundamental to everyday life. Seventeen Equations that Changed the World examines seventeen groundbreaking equations that have altered the course of human history. He explores how Pythagoras’s Theorem led to GPS and SatNav; how logarithms are applied in architecture; why imaginary numbers were important in the development of the digital camera, and what is really going on with Schrödinger’s cat. Entertaining, surprising and vastly informative, Seventeen Equations that Changed the World is a highly original exploration – and explanation – of life on earth.

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  • Ian Stewart author of the bestselling <i>Professor Stewart's Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities</i> presents a new and magical mix of games puzzles paradoxes brainteasers and riddles. He mingles these with forays into ancient and modern mathematical thought appallingly hilarious mathematical jokes and enquiries into the great mathematical challenges of the present and past. Amongst a host of arcane and astonishing facts about every kind of number from irrational or imaginary to complex or cuneiform we find out: how to organise chaos; how matter balances anti-matter; how to turn a sphere inside out (without creasing it…); why you can't comb a hairy ball; how to calculate pi by observing the stars. And we get some tantalising glimpses of the maths of life and the universe.Mind-stretching enlightening and endlessly amusing Professor Stewart's new entertainment will stimulate delight and enthral.>

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  • A book of mathematical oddities: games, puzzles, facts, numbers and delightful mathematical nibbles for the curious and adventurous mind.>

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