0 items0.00

No products in the cart.

Category: ESSAYS

ESSAYS

Showing 1–20 of 104 results

  • The Hachette Essentials series comprises a collection of titles that are regarded as modern classics. A carefully and lovingly curated selection of distinctive, ground-breaking fiction and non-fiction titles published since 1950. Timeless. Relevant. Passionate. Unified as a series – distinctive as books. A good book is great. A great book is essential.

    A hilarious collection of essays from ‘the premier observer of our world and its weirdnesses,’ New York Times bestselling author David Sedaris (Adam Kay, author of This is Going to Hurt)

    Anyone who has heard David Sedaris speaking live or on the radio will tell you that a collection from him is cause for jubilation. A move to Paris from New York inspired these hilarious pieces, including ‘Me Talk Pretty One Day’, about his attempts to learn French from a sadistic teacher who declares that ‘every day spent with you is like having a caesarean section’.

    His family is another inspiration. ‘You Can’t Kill the Rooster’ is a portrait of his brother, who talks incessant hip-hop slang to his bewildered father. And no one hones a finer fury in response to such modern annoyances as restaurant meals presented in ludicrous towers of food and cashiers with six-inch fingernails.

    Readers say:

    ‘Fantastically funny book which gets better and better’

    ‘Oh how I loved this book. David Sedaris and his adventures in learning to speak French made me cry with laughter, especially the terrifying teacher at the language classes’

    ‘Why have I not discovered him before’

    Add to CartBuy Now
  • A creative call to arms from the mind of Neil Gaiman, combining his extraordinary words with deft and striking illustrations by Chris Riddell. Art Matters will inspire its readers to seize the day in the name of art.

    Be bold. Be rebellious. Choose art. It matters.

    Neil Gaiman once said that ‘the world always seems brighter when you’ve just made something that wasn’t there before’. This little book is the embodiment of that vision. Drawn together from speeches, poems and creative manifestos, Art Matters explores how reading, imagining and creating can change the world, and will be inspirational to young and old.

    Add to CartBuy Now
  • A. A. Gill (1954-2016) was born in Edinburgh. He was the TV and restaurant critic and regular features-writer for the Sunday Times, a columnist for Esquire and contributor to Australian Gourmet Traveller. He was the author of A. A. Gill is Away, The Angry Island, Previous Convictions, Table Talk, Paper View, A. A. Gill is Further Away and The Golden Door, as well as two novels and the memoir Pour Me, which was shortlisted for the 2016 PEN Ackerley Prize. Lines in the Sand, a collection of his journalism in recent years, will be published in 2017.

    Read More
  • John Murray (Publishers) believe strongly that the best non-fiction isn’t confined by category – as our 250-year history shows. Alexander von Humboldt’s Personal Narrative of his five years exploring South America came out in 1814; it was a major influence on Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution and his seminal Origin of Species (1859) and both inspired Andrea Wulf to write her multiple prize-winning The Invention of Nature (2015). John Murray are immensely proud to have been the publisher of all three, very different books across over two centuries.

    To mark our anniversary year, this collection of truly original essays from the writing prize with The Spectator explores the theme of ‘origins’. From beginnings and discoveries, to ideas and movements, these essays take us across the world, into outer space and deep into the past.

    Read More
  • This collection of Mary-Kay Wilmers’ essays, book reviews, short articles and obituaries handles subjects from mistresses to marketing, and seduction to psychoanalysts, all with Wilmers’ trademark insightful wit. Throughout she uses her deep and varied knowledge to provide both context and cutting criticism. This creates a portrait of a particular slice of English culture in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

    Read More
  • I ate and ate and ate in the hopes that if I made myself big, my body would be safe. I buried the girl I was because she ran into all kinds of trouble. I tried to erase every memory of her, but she is still there, somewhere. . . . I was trapped in my body, one that I barely recognized or understood, but at least I was safe.’

    In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her past-including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life-and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

    With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and power that have made her one of the most admired writers of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for delicious and satisfying food, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved-in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.

    Read More
  • Another side of Stieg Larsson – incisive articles and texts by the author of the Millennium Trilogy.

    Read More
  • In Mid-Air is a collection of short essays by the acclaimed writer and speaker, Adam Gopnik. Known for his ability to perceive ‘the whole world in a grain of sand’, he uses this format to take a dizzying range of subjects and intricately explore their meaning to our lives – as people, as citizens and as families.

    From how he works so that his daughter can have holes in her clothes, to why appropriation is more empowering than oppressing; from French sex to binge-watching TV, from the secret of a happy marriage to why we should mention the war ­­- each topic is illuminated by his erudition and wit.

    As in their original form on the radio, Gopnik’s essays – each one a pleasure garden of wry confessions, self-deprecating asides, wordplay and striking insights – feel like the most intimate of conversations between writer and reader; yet at the same time they capture a public forum of pithy debate and tender persuasion. Above all, In Mid-Air initiates a sense of wonder in the ordinary that yearns to be shared.

    Read More
  • Engaging, witty, thoughtful, clever, casual, ebullient, erudite and thoroughly modern’ Spectator

    ‘A dazzling talent – hilarious, winning and deft’ Malcolm Gladwell

    In Mid-Air is a collection of short essays by the acclaimed writer and speaker, Adam Gopnik. Known for his ability to perceive ‘the whole world in a grain of sand’, he uses this format to take a dizzying range of subjects and intricately explore their meaning to our lives – as people, as citizens and as families.

    From how he works so that his daughter can have holes in her clothes, to why appropriation is more empowering than oppressing; from French sex to binge-watching TV, from the secret of a happy marriage to why we should mention the war ­­- each topic is illuminated by his erudition and wit.

    As in their original form on the radio, Gopnik’s essays – each one a pleasure garden of wry confessions, self-deprecating asides, wordplay and striking insights – feel like the most intimate of conversations between writer and reader; yet at the same time they capture a public forum of pithy debate and tender persuasion. Above all, In Mid-Air initiates a sense of wonder in the ordinary that yearns to be shared.

    Read More
  • Featuring a gathering of more than fifty of contemporary literature’s finest voices this volume will enchant move and inspire readers with its tales of The Writing Life. In it authors divulge professional secrets: how they first discovered they were writers how they work how they deal with the myriad frustrations and delights a writer’s life affords. Culled from ten years of the distinguished Washington Post column of the same name The Writing Life highlights an eclectic group of luminaries who have wildly varied stories to tell but who share this singularly beguiling career. Here are their pleasures as well as their peeves; revelations of their deepest fears; dramas of triumphs and failures; insights into the demands and rewards.

    Each piece is accompanied by a brief and vivid biography of the writer by Washington Post Book World editor Marie Arana who also provides an introduction to the collection. The result is a rare view from the inside: a close examination of writers’ concerns about the creative process and the place of literature in America. For anyone interested in the making of fiction and nonfiction here is a fascinating vantage on the writer’s world–an indispensable guide to the craft.

    >

    Read More
  • Ayun Halliday may not make for the most sensible travel companion but she is certainly one of the most outrageous with a knack for inserting herself (and her unwitting cohorts) into bizarre situations around the globe. Curator of kitsch and unabashed aficionada of pop culture Halliday offers bemused self-deprecating narration of events from guerilla theatre in Romania to drug-induced Apocalypse Now reenactments in Vietnam to a perhaps even more surreal collagen-implant demonstration at a Paris fashion show emceed by Lauren Bacall. On layover in Amsterdam Halliday finds unlikely trouble in the red-light districteliciting the ire of a tiny violent madam and is forced to explain tampons to luggage-searching soldiers in Kashmir: “They’re for ladies. Bleeding ladies.” A self-admittedly bumbling tourist Halliday shareswith razor-sharp wit and to hilarious effectthe travel stories most are too self-conscious to tell. This second edition includes a new foreword from the author.>

    Read More
  • Change looms in Havana Cuba’s capital a city electric with uncertainty yet cloaked in cliché 90 miles from U.S. shores and off-limits to most Americans. Journalist Julia Cooke who lived there at intervals over a period of five years discovered a dynamic scene: baby-faced anarchists with Mohawks gelled with laundry soap whiskey-drinking children of the elite Santería trainees pregnant prostitutes university graduates planning to leave for the first country that will give them a visa. This last generation of Cubans raised under Fidel Castro animate life in a waning era of political stagnation as the rest of the world beckons: waiting out storms at rummy hurricane parties and attending raucous drag cabarets planning ascendant music careers and black-market business ventures trying to reconcile the undefined future with the urgent today.Eye-opening and politically prescient The Other Side of Paradise offers a deep new understanding of a place that has so confounded and intrigued us.>

    Read More
  • In Spent editor Kerry Cohen opens the closet doors wide to tales of women’s true relationships with shopping from humorous stories of love/hate relationships with the mall to heartbreaking tales of overspending to fix relationships. With a contributor list that includes notable female writers like Emily Chenoweth Ophira Eisenberg Allison Amend and Aryn Kyle the essays each shine light on the particular impact shopping has on all of us.Whether they’re cleaning out closets of loved ones hiding a shoplifting habit trying out extreme couponing dividing up family possessions or buying a brand-new car while in labour the book’s contributors vacillate between convincing themselves to spend and struggling not to. This illuminating anthology links the effects shopping has on our emotions whether it fills us with guilt happiness resentment or doubt our self-worth and our relationships with parents grandparents lovers children and friends.>

    Read More
  • Spanning 15 years of travel beginning when she is a sophomore in college Wanderlust documents Elisabeth Eaves’s insatiable hunger for the rush of the unfamiliar and the experience of encountering new people and cultures. Young and independent she crisscrosses five continents and chases the exotic both in culture and in romance. In the jungles of Papua New Guinea she loses herselfliterallyto an Australian tour guide in Cairo she reconnects with her high school sweetheart only to discover the beginning of a pattern that will characterize her life over the long-term: while long-distance relationships work well for her traditional relationships do not. Wanderlust however is more than a chronological conquest of men and countries: at its core it’s a journey of self-discovery. In the course of her travels Eaves finds herself and the sense of home she’s been lacking since childhoodand she sheds light on a growing culture of young women who have the freedom and inclination to define their own increasingly global lifestyles unfettered by traditional roles and conventions of past generations of women.>

    Read More
Open chat