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Category: ART

ART

Showing 1–20 of 40 results

  • Pablo Picasso was one of the most prodigious and revolutionary artists in the history of Western painting. Gertrude Stein was an avant-garde American writer, art collector, eccentric and self-styled genius. Her Paris home was the leading salon for artists and writers between the Wars. Picasso painted Stein’s portrait and they became firm friends. Their correspondence extends across a time of extraordinary social and political change, between 1906 and 1944, effectively from the Belle Epoque to the German Occupation of the Second World War. Both wrote in French — a language neither ever entirely mastered. Written as letters, cards and scribbled notes, their intimate correspondence touches lightly on both the weighty and the everyday — holidays, money, dinner invitations, art, family, lovers, travel arrangements, how work goes, or the war. The correspondence has been carefully edited and is presented by period, each introduced with an outline of significant personal and historical events of the time. Explanatory notes to the letters are rich in background detail. The volume also features photographs, facsimiles of postcards and letters as well as sketches, drawings and paintings by Picasso.

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  • Wearer of many hats-philanthropist, entrepreneur, computer scientist, engineer, teacher-Sudha Murty has above all always been a storyteller extraordinaire. Winner of the R.K. Narayan Award for Literature, the Padma Shri, the Attimabbe Award from the government of Karnataka for excellence in Kannada literature, and the Raymond Crossword Lifetime Achievement Award, her repertoire includes adult non-fiction, adult fiction, children’s books, travelogues and technical books. Here, There and Everywhere is a celebration of her literary journey and is her 200th title across genres and languages. Bringing together her best-loved stories from various collections alongside some new ones and a thoughtful introduction, here is a book that is, in every sense, as multifaceted as its author.

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  • So often, it’s the simplest acts of courage that touch the lives of others. Sudha Murty-through the exceptional work of the Infosys Foundation as well as through her own youth, family life and travels-encounters many such stories . . . and she tells them here in her characteristically clear-eyed, warm-hearted way. She talks candidly about the meaningful impact of her work in the devadasi community, her trials and tribulations as the only female student in her engineering college and the unexpected and inspiring consequences of her father’s kindness. From the quiet joy of discovering the reach of Indian cinema and the origins of Indian vegetables to the shallowness of judging others based on appearances, these are everyday struggles and victories, large and small.
    Unmasking both the beauty and ugliness of human nature, each of the real-life stories in this collection is reflective of a life lived with grace.

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  • What secrets lurk in a family’s past—and how important are they in the here and now?Sudha Murty’s new book comprises two novellas that explore two quests by two different men—both for mothers they never knew they had.Venkatesh, a bank manager, stumbles upon his lookalike one fine day. When he probes further, he discovers his father’s hidden past, which includes an abandoned wife and child. Ventakesh is determined to make amends to his impoverished stepmother—but how can he repay his father’s debt?Mukesh, a young man, is shocked to realize after his father’s death that he was actually adopted. He sets out to find his biological mother, but the deeper he delves, the more confused he is about where his loyalties should lie: with the mother who gave birth to him, or with the mother who brought him up. The Mother I Never Knew is a poignant, dramatic book that reaches deep into the human heart to reveal what we really feel about those closest to us.

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  • Anupama looked into the mirror and shivered with shock. A small white patch had now appeared on her arm.’ Anupama’s fairytale marriage to Anand falls apart when she discovers a white patch on her foot and learns that she has leukoderma. Abandoned by her uncaring in-laws and insensitive husband, she is forced to return to her father’s home in the village. The social stigma of a married woman living with her parents, her steother’s continual barbs and the ostracism that accompanies her skin condition force her to contemplate suicide. Determined to rebuild her life against all odds, Anupama goes to Bombay where she finds success, respect and the promise of an enduring friendship. Mahashweta is an inspiring story of courage and resilience in a world marred by illusions and betrayals. This poignant tale offers hope and solace to the victims of the prejudices that govern society even today.

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  • In the context of K. G. Subramanyans oeuvre: images of women occupy a predominant place. In the two available volumes of his drawings, and which we may consider representative of his oeuvre, nearly one half of the images are of women or those in which women predominate. R. Sivakumar For most artists, the practice of drawing is a means to an end. Not so for Subramanyanmost of his drawings are ends in themselves. This volume of 322 drawings of women spans six decades of the artists work and make up the exhibition Women Seen and Remembered: Drawings by K. G. Subramanyan.The volume also includes an essay by R. Sivakumar.Our responses to works of art or literature can be of various kindsto start with a surface relationship; sliding over it to keep up your senses. Then an encounter with its details, its context, story, its style. Then the discovery of a special feature that lifts you up into a new horizon: like a tower. K. G. Subramanyan

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  • Photographer Pedro Meyer is one of the pioneers of contemporary photography and was an early leader in its digital revolution. InA Kind of Touching Beautyhis lens is focused on the American city, capturing its growth and transition through the 1980s and 90s. Alongside Meyers striking images that distill the spirit of the city, the book presents essays by Jean-Paul Sartre. Originally published as part ofThe Aftermath of Warand based upon Sartres extended visit to America in 1945, the essays create a parallel journey with Meyers photographsthe same cities are seen at a different time, through a different cultural lens. Marked by a philosophers vision and a writers sensitivity, Sartres meditations on America are at once poetic and incisive. As he travels the length and breadth of the country, Sartre discovers the soul of American cities, so distinct from the spirit of urban Europe: Everyone is free here. . . . The cities are open. They are open to the world and to the future. That is what gives them all an air of adventure; and . . . a kind of touching beauty. Together, the photographs and essays articulate the enduring essence of American urban existenceits relationship with time, with labor and humanity, and with the open spaces that are emblematic of America.

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  • For more than three decades, artist William Kentridge has explored in his work the nature of subjectivity, the possibilities of revolution, the Enlightenments legacy in Africa, and the nature of time itself. At the same time, his creative work has stretched the boundaries of the very media he employs. Though his pieces have allowed viewers to encounter the traditions of landscape and self-portraiture, the limits of representation and the possibilities for animated drawing, and the labor of art, no guide to understanding the full scope of his art has been available until now.

    For five days, Kentridge sat with Rosalind C. Morris to talk about his work. The resultThat Which Is Not Drawnis a wide-ranging conversation and deep investigation into the artists techniques and into the psychic and philosophical underpinnings of his body of work. In these pages, Kentridge explains the key concerns of his art, including the virtues of bastardy, the ethics of provisionality, the nature of translation and the activity of the viewer. And together, Kentridge and Morris trace the migration of images across his works and consider the possibilities for a revolutionary art that remains committed to its own transformation.

    Thats the thing about a conversation, Kentridge reflects. The activity and the performance, whether its the performance of drawing or the performance of speech and conversation, is also the engine for new thoughts to happen. Its not just a report of something you know. And here, in this engaging dialogue, we at last have a guide to the continually exciting, continually changing work of one of our greatest living artists.

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  • What does it mean to be a woman filmmaker in India? One famous director suffered from depression, unable to take on film projects because of her young child. Another was asked in an interview if she drinks and smokes to deal with the stress of filmmaking like men do. Some faced cinematographers who refused to listen to them. Almost all of them struggle to raise money for films with female protagonists. But they are also cool and sassy. One attended film-school with her two-week-old baby. Another stormed the once all-male bastion of the 200-crore club. They can make a hit film about a middle-aged housewife, as much as a bisexual teenager with a disability. F-rated brings together diverse stories of eleven women filmmakers in India: Aparna Sen, Mira Nair, Farah Khan, Meghna Gulzar, Nandita Das, Shonali Bose, Tanuja Chandra, Anjali Menon, Reema Kagti, Kiran Rao and Alankrita Srivastava. A celebration of their womanhood as much as their work – this is a must-read.

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  • William Dalrymple’s striking and meditative photographs mark an accomplished leap of form for a hugely beloved writer. Shot over two years, and across geographies, they pay homage to the beauty and disquiet of landscape, form and time. A part of his debut exhibition, The Writer’s Eye, they were curated by Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi, who lends an introduction to this edition.

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  • Soumitra Chatterjee became internationally famous with his debut in Satyajit Ray’s Apur Sansar. In an era when Uttam Kumar ruled the minds and hearts of Bengali film audiences, Chatterjee carved a niche for himself, emerging as one of the finest actors, not only in India, but also in the world. Beyond Apu – 20 Favourite Film Roles of Soumitra Chatterjee looks at the cinematic life of this thespian through twenty of the most iconic characters he has essayed. Handpicked by the star himself, and brimming over with vintage anecdotes, this is a fascinating read on the art and craft of a master at work. Including insightful essays on his theatre and other artistic achievements, this book not only introduces the reader to an icon of Indian cinema but also offers a unique insight into the mind of a genius.

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  • Everyone knows about the Ramsays – even those who have never watched a Ramsay film. But who were they really? Where did they come from? Why did they make the films they did? And how? How, really, did they pull it off? In India, the Ramsay name remains synonymous with horror movies. Still, all these decades later. Don’t Disturb the Dead is the story of their cinema, their methods and madnesses, the people and the processes, arguments and agreements, about horror cinema as a business model, and more. It is also an open-minded and affectionate ode to the ‘disreputable’ Ramsay films, and to a family that was once a genre in itself, one whose contribution to cinema deserves to be recognized.

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  • Raj Kapoor, the creator of some of Hindi cinema’s most enduring classics, is one of the greatest film-makers India has ever produced. As producer, director, actor, editor, storyteller, he blazed a trail for subsequent generations of film-makers to follow and aspire to. He was also known to the world as an extraordinary and controversial showman, an entertainer par excellence, someone who created the template for Hindi cinema. Raj Kapoor: The One and Only Showman is a unique experiment, both an autobiography and a biography. While the autobiography uses his own words, culled from interviews, journals and anecdotes, to provide an intimate glimpse into the mind of a genius, the biography is an attempt to record for posterity the lesser-known facets of his magnificent personality through the recollections of his family, colleagues and friends. As revealing as it is engaging, this is a fascinating portrait of the man regarded as the last of the true movie moguls of Indian cinema.

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  • Hindi cinema was trapped in formulaic cliches for decades: lost-and-found themes, sacrificing mothers, brothers on opposite sides of the law, villains lording over their dens, colourful molls, six songs, the use of rape as a plot pivot, and cops who always arrived too late. It hit an all-time low in the 1980s. Then, in 1991, came liberalization, and a wave of openness and aspiration swept across urban India. Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge was released in 1995 – and Hindi cinema became Bollywood. A new crop of film-makers began to challenge and break away from established rules. Over the next twenty years, a number of Hindi films consistently pushed the envelope in terms of content and technique to create a new kind of cinema. Among other innovations, film-makers came up with ways of crowd funding a film (Ankhon Dekhi), did away with songs if the narrative did not need them (Gangaajal), addressed different sexual preferences (My Brother … Nikhil) and people with special needs (Black) like no one had ever done before. As film critic with the Indian Express, Shubhra Gupta has stayed the course these twenty years and more and experienced the transition first-hand. In 50 Films That Changed Bollywood, 1995-2015, she looks at the modern classics that have redefined Hindi cinema – from DDLJ and Rangeela to Satya and Dev D to Queen and Bajrangi Bhaijaan. Gupta offers a fascinating glimpse into how these films spoke to their viewers and how the viewers reacted to them – and, ultimately, how they changed us and how we changed them.

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  • Satyajit Ray is acknowledged as one of the world’s finest film-makers. His films changed the way the world looked at Indian cinema. But Ray was not only a film-maker. He was also a bestselling writer of novels and short stories, and possibly the only Indian film-maker who wrote prolifically on cinema. This book brings together, for the first time in one volume, some of his most cerebral writings on film. With the economy and precision that marked his films, Ray writes on the art and craft of cinema, pens an ode to silent cinema, discusses the problems in adapting literary works to film, pays tributes to contemporaries like Godard and Uttam Kumar, and even gives us a peek into his experiences at film festivals, both as a jury member and as a contestant. Published in association with the Society for the Preservation of Satyajit Ray Films, and including fascinating photographs by and of the master, Deep Focus not only reveals Ray’s engagement with cinema but also provides an invaluable insight into the mind of a genius.

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  • A comprehensive analysis of the work of one of India’s foremost poets Gulzar is arguably the most well-known contemporary poet writing in Hindustani. As a poet he occupies a unique place being a Progressive poet in a popular culture. His poetry appeals to all strata of society, without compromising either on literary merit or on its ability to convey the most exalted thought in an accessible idiom. In ‘He Swallowed the Moon’, Saba Bashir attempts to analyse what makes Gulzar the poet he is. What is his signature style? What are the issues that concern his poetry and what are the recurrent images in it? She also draws a parallel between the poet’s film and non-film poetry and points out how they are used interchangeably. Including the most comprehensive list of all Gulzar’s poems, film and non-film songs, this is a valuable addition to the corpus of work on a great poet.

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  • Golden Axe. The Sims. Half Life. Mega Drive. SNES. Like many teenagers around the world, Edward Ross grew up on a steady diet of video games and fascinating gadgets. As he continued to obsess over video games while drawing comic books, he started wondering what it was that made them more than just a pastime. Why do we play?

    This gorgeously illustrated book takes us deep into the history of video games, from the early prototypes created in the late 1940s through the growth of the medium in the 1970s and into the modern era, in which games are a crucial part of mainstream culture. Exploring politics, history and personal stories, and moving seamlessly from the greatest hits to engrossing indie games, Gamish is a love letter to an obsession that has gripped more than two billion people around the world.

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  • What do lace makers share with pulmonary surgeons? Saville Row tailors with molecular scientists? Jazz musicians with fighter pilots? Seemingly, they have little in common, other than being skilled at what they do. But the expert on experts, Professor Roger Kneebone, has spent his life finding the points of connection. As he shows, while the outcome is always different, the journey to expertise is always the same.

    From ‘doing time’ as an Apprentice, knowing nothing and learning by copying how things are already done, through setting out on your own as a Journeyman, developing your own voice and taking responsibility for your work, to finally becoming a Master and refining your knowledge through passing it on to future generations, Kneebone articulates a path we’re all following – and there’s comfort in locating yourself, understanding how far there is to go, and seeing how far you’ve come.

    Drawing on cutting-edge research, including his own work with a variety of extraordinary experts from taxidermists to neurosurgeons, and a tradition of learning established in medieval workshops, in this ground-breaking book, Professor Kneebone reveals with colour and panache the symbiotic system that creates and sustains experts, whatever their field, and explains how you can become one yourself, whether you’re learning a language, giving a presentation, or simply becoming the person you want to be.

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  • Over his thirty-year career at Cond Nast, Nicholas Coleridge has witnessed it all. From the anxieties of the Princess of Wales to the blazing fury of Mohamed Al-Fayed, his story is also the story of the people who populate the glamorous world of glossy magazines. With relish and astonishing candour, he offers the inside scoop on Tina Brown and Anna Wintour, David Bowie and Philip Green, Kate Moss and Beyonce and a surreal weekend away with Bob Geldof and William Hague. The Glossy Years also provides perceptive insight into the changing and treacherous worlds of fashion, journalism, museums and a whole sweep of British society. This is a rich, honest, witty and very personal memoir of a life splendidly lived.

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  • The updated edition of Julian Barnes best-loved writing on art, with seven new exquisite illustrated essays

    Flaubert believed that it was impossible to explain one art form in terms of another, and that great paintings required no words of explanation. Braque thought the ideal state would be reached when we said nothing at all in front of a painting. But we are very far from reaching that state. We remain incorrigibly verbal creatures who love to explain things, to form opinions, to argue… It is a rare picture which stuns, or argues, us into silence. And if one does, it is only a short time before we want to explain and understand the very silence into which we have been plunged.

    Julian Barnes began writing about art with a chapter on Gricaults The Raft of the Medusa in his 1989 novel A History of the World in 10 Chapters. Since then he has written a series of remarkable essays, chiefly about French artists, which trace the story of how art made its way from Romanticism to Realism and into Modernism.

    Fully illustrated in colour throughout, Keeping an Eye Open contains Barnes essays on Gricault, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Morisot, Fantin-Latour, Czanne, Degas, Cassatt, Redon, Van Gogh, the legendary critic Huysmans, Bonnard, Vuillard, Vallotton, Braque, Magritte, Oldenburg, Howard Hodgkin and Lucian Freud. It also offers new perspectives on the fruitful relationship between writers and artists, and on the rivalry among Russian collectors of French art in the late 19th century.

    A typically elegant and absorbing book by one of the greatest contemporary English writers. Guardian *Books of the Year*
    Gave me a new confidence in how to understand and, more importantly, enjoy wandering around an exhibition. Mariella Frostrup
    My book of the year. Natalie Haynes, Independent

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