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Category: Non-Fiction/ Reference

Non-Fiction/ Reference

Showing 261–280 of 310 results

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    Did you ever wonder why there are no high-flying superheroes in real life? Find out what keeps big animals (like us) from performing amazing feats of strength and agility, yet why being tiny and powerful might have a downside. What if you could lift fifty times your weight (hello, ant), but getting wet could kill you? Or you could soar like a bird, but a cold breeze would do you in? From an award-winning duo, an intriguing look at what it means to be just the right size.
    Back matter includes an index and a glossary.

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  • Llegar a Ser Pedro

    Antes de que Pedro Martínez fuese elegido al Salon de la Fama del Béisbol, antes de que hiciera posible que los Medias Rojas ganaran la Serie Mundial, antes de que fuera seleccionado ocho veces para formar parte del equipo de la Liga de las Estrellas, antes de que recibiera el Premio Cy Young tres veces, Pedro era un niño que nació en Manoguayabo, un pequeño pueblo de la República Dominicana. Pedro amaba el béisbol más que nada en el mundo, y Ramón, su hermano mayor, era el mejor lanzador que él había visto jamás. Pedro soñaba que llegaría un día en el que su hermano y él jugarían juntos en las Grande Ligas.
    Esta es la historia de cómo ese sueño se hizo realidad.

    Before Pedro Martínez was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, before he pitched the Red Sox to a World Series championship, before he was named to the All-Star team eight times and won the Cy Young three times, he was a kid from a place called Manoguayabo in the Dominican Republic. Pedro loved baseball more than anything, and his older brother Ramon was the best pitcher he’d ever seen. He’d dream of the day he and his brother could play together in the major leagues—and here, Matt Tavares tells the story of how that dream came true.

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  • Deadly!

    Sometimes nature can be nasty: snakes that spit poison, insects with exploding bottoms, and tigers that have you for dinner. Throughout the animal kingdom, creatures are equipped with lethal weapons, from finger-length fangs to toxic tentacles, and have ingenious ways of killing one another, from poisoning to dive-bombing to strangling and even electrocuting! Discover the murderous methods of attack and defense that make animals armed, dangerous, and deadly. Kids will sink their teeth into this fascinating look at nature’s fiercest creatures. Back matter includes an index and a glossary.

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  • Talk, Talk, Squawk!

    How does a stinkbug flirt, a bee give orders, or a panda say “back off”? Animals find all sorts of ways to keep in touch without saying a word. They use colors, patterns, smells, movements, vibrations, sounds, and even electricity to communicate. From the chatter of dolphins to the click of a moth, from the stripes of a reef fish to the rumbling of elephants, this funny, fascinating book unlocks the mysteries of how animals talk and squawk to one another—and how humans try to talk back. Back matter includes an index and a glossary.

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  • Welcome to New Zealand: A Nature Journal

    Kids love to be outside, but it’s easy to miss all the astounding wonders of nature, unless you look closely. Have you ever noticed that ladybugs have different numbers of spots? When you look at a leaf, what do you see: is it pointed or round, long or short, soft or hard? In this stunning idea book, acclaimed author and illustrator Sandra Morris shares her love for the flora and fauna of her native New Zealand and encourages budding scientists to record their own discoveries in creative ways, no matter where they live. Back matter includes a glossary, an index, and a bibliography.

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  • Jazz Day

    What happens when you invite as many jazz musicians as you can to pose for a photo in 1950s Harlem? In a captivating collection of poems, Roxane Orgill steps into the frame of Harlem 1958, bringing to life the musicians’ mischief and quirks, their memorable style, and the vivacious atmosphere of a Harlem block full of kids on a hot summer’s day. Francis Vallejo’s vibrant, detailed, and wonderfully expressive paintings do loving justice to the larger-than-life quality of jazz musicians of the era. Includes bios of several of the fifty-seven musicians, an author’s note, source notes, a bibliography, and a foldout of Art Kane’s famous photograph.

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  • Amid the scholars, poets, authors, and artists of the Harlem Renaissance stood an Afro–Puerto Rican named Arturo Schomburg. This law clerk’s passion was to collect books, letters, music, and art from Africa and the African diaspora and bring to light the achievements of people of African descent through the ages. A century later, his groundbreaking collection, known as the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, has become a beacon to scholars all over the world. In luminous paintings and arresting poems, two of children’s literature’s top African-American scholars track Arturo Schomburg’s quest to correct history.

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  • Playing with Collage

    Whether using dried flowers or tiny shells, spaghetti or postage stamps, Jeannie Baker draws from the world around her to make work that is singularly beautiful and imaginative. Incorporating a wide range of textures, her arresting collage pieces have earned her international acclaim. Now she shares her secrets and encourages readers to get creative: each of the four main sections in Playing with Collage presents an abstract collage by the artist and offers suggestions and starting points for anyone aspiring to master the art.

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  • Mary Seacole: Bound for the Battlefield

    Mary Seacole spent much of her life on the front lines of the Crimean War, ministering to the wounded, caring for soldiers, and making her mark on the world of medicine. This fascinating biography honors Mary Seacole’s life, from her childhood in Kingston, Jamaica, and her encounters with racist Americans to her treatment of cholera patients in Panama and her bitter run-in with Florence Nightingale, who declined to work with her in Crimea because she wasn’t white. But Mary Seacole knew that the sick and wounded needed her compassion and care, and despite all obstacles, she answered the call to help them. Author Susan Goldman Rubin gives voice to this fearless nurse and healer through captivating details drawn from Mary Seacole’s own writings, while debut illustrator Richie Pope vividly captures her service at the bedside and on the battlefield. Inspiring and engaging, this biography introduces a compelling heroine who rose above barriers to earn a place in history.

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  • Greek Myths and Mazes

    Discover the legendary labyrinths and mythologized mazes of ancient Greece in a beautifully designed book of paths and stories. Each turn of a page lands the reader in a new and exciting Greek classic through which to chart a path, learning along the way. From the twelve labors of Heracles to the labyrinth of the Minotaur, from the trials of Odysseus to the Colossus of Rhodes, illustrations present ancient stories as new and puzzling quests to complete. Packed with intricate details and plenty of information about the history and mythology of ancient Greece, this tome will astound explorers and inquisitive minds of all ages.

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  • Darwin's Rival: Alfred Russel Wallace and the Search for Evolution

    Everyone knows Charles Darwin, the famous naturalist who proposed a theory of evolution. But not everyone knows the story of Alfred Russel Wallace, Darwin’s friend and rival who simultaneously discovered the process of natural selection. This sumptuously illustrated book tells Wallace’s story, from his humble beginnings to his adventures in the Amazon rain forest and Malay Archipelago, and demonstrates the great contribution he made to one of the most important scientific discoveries of all time.

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    What have I to fear?
    My master broke every promise to me.
    I lost my beloved wife and our dear children.
    All, sold South. Neither my time nor my body is mine.
    The breath of life is all I have to lose.
    And bondage is suffocating me.

    Henry Brown wrote that long before he came to be known as Box, he “entered the world a slave.” He was put to work as a child and passed down from one generation to the next — as property. When he was an adult, his wife and children were sold away from him out of spite. Henry Brown watched as his family left bound in chains, headed to the deeper South. What more could be taken from him? But then hope — and help — came in the form of the Underground Railroad. Escape!

    In stanzas of six lines each, each line representing one side of a box, celebrated poet Carole Boston Weatherford powerfully narrates Henry Brown’s story of how he came to send himself in a box from slavery to freedom. Strikingly illustrated in rich hues and patterns by artist Michele Wood, Box is augmented with historical records and an introductory excerpt from Henry’s own writing as well as a time line, notes from the author and illustrator, and a bibliography.

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  • The History of Money

    What can take the form of a stone with a hole in the middle, a string of shells, a piece of paper, or a plastic card? The answer is money, of course. But when did we start using it? And why? What does money have to do with writing? And how do taxes and interest work? From the Stone Age to modern banking, this lighthearted and engaging account traces the history of the stuff that makes the world go round.

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  • Get Coding 2! Build Five Computer Games Using HTML and JavaScript

    Learn HTML and JavaScript. Design and build five interactive computer games. Create cool graphics. Code simple artificial intelligence. This appealing guide, covering essential coding concepts, offers an ideal introduction to all these activities and more. By following simple step-by-step instructions and completing five exciting missions, aspiring programmers are invited to code well-known games such as tic-tac-toe and table tennis, then customize their projects to test their skills.

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  • Wild Girl: How to Have Incredible Outdoor Adventures

    From kayaking the length of the Amazon to biking to the South Pole and running an ultramarathon across the Namib desert, Helen Skelton shares the stories of her most daring feats of endurance and grit in some of the world’s most extreme wildernesses—overcoming challenges, embracing her fears, and finding the positives in the toughest situations. Alongside each exciting account are ideas for outdoor adventures readers can have closer to home, as well as gear lists, information about Helen’s support teams, statistics, tips for physical and mental preparation, and a Wild Girl Wall of Fame featuring the diverse women who inspired Helen with their own achievements. A likable, no-nonsense tone paired with a combination of photographs and fun art will inspire young people to get outside and dream big.

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    Mites and lice, fleas, ticks, and tapeworms — most living creatures that have a habitat also are a habitat, including you (are you itchy yet?). Unwelcome guests — parasites — are everywhere, from the barnacles hitching a ride on a humpback whale’s head to the tiny flies that control a bee’s brain and make it literally dig its own grave. Now an expert team returns for an in-depth look at how these insidious critters do it, whether it’s leaping aboard moving targets or morphing their body shapes, and what their unwitting hosts have learned to do to fight back and reclaim their space.
    Back matter includes an index and a glossary.

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    For young artists, tricksters, and crafters, here is a hip, friendly how-to manual for creating removable and shareable art projects from easily found materials. The sneaky part is in the installation! Each work of art is custom-created for display in public places — a tiny cork-bottomed boat in a public fountain, a plate of tiny paper cupcakes on your teacher’s desk, a penny left on the ground for a stranger, a funny message left on your mother’s bathroom mirror, and more. This utterly unique guide — part craft book, part art-philosophy — offers a stylish and sweet “made-you-look-twice” spirit of fun meant to put a smile on the faces of strangers and loved ones alike.

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  • Into the Unknown

    Ready to relive some of the most daring voyages of all time? Unfold these spectacular cross sections and explore fourteen historic journeys, with the help of dramatic storytelling and sidebars that highlight key concepts, places, and technology. Presented in a larger format to make these exciting journeys even more accessible and engaging.
    Back matter includes an index, a glossary, and sources.

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  • 42 Is Not Just a Number

    Jackie Robinson’s athletic talents would have easily landed another man a career in pro sports, but such opportunities were closed to athletes like Jackie for one reason: his skin was the wrong color. Jackie settled for playing baseball in the Negro Leagues until 1946, when the manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers recruited him for a position that would cause him to face cruel and sometimes violent hatred and discrimination: Jackie Robinson was going to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball. In this compelling biography, award-winning author Doreen Rappaport chronicles the extraordinary life of Jackie Robinson and how his achievements won over — and changed — a segregated nation.

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  • All Thirteen: The Incredible Cave Rescue of the Thai Boys' Soccer Team

    On June 23, 2018, twelve young players of the Wild Boars soccer team and their coach enter a cave in northern Thailand seeking an afternoon’s adventure. But when they turn to leave, rising floodwaters block their path out. The boys are trapped! Before long, news of the missing team spreads, launching a seventeen-day rescue operation involving thousands of rescuers from around the globe. As the world sits vigil, people begin to wonder: how long can a group of ordinary kids survive in complete darkness, with no food or clean water? Luckily, the Wild Boars are a very extraordinary “ordinary” group. Combining firsthand interviews of rescue workers with in-depth science and details of the region’s culture and religion, author Christina Soontornvat—who was visiting family in Northern Thailand when the Wild Boars went missing—masterfully shows how both the complex engineering operation above ground and the mental struggles of the thirteen young people below proved critical in the life-or-death mission. Meticulously researched and generously illustrated with photographs, this page-turner includes an author’s note describing her experience meeting the team, detailed source notes, and a bibliography to fully immerse readers in the most ambitious cave rescue in history.

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